Tag Archives: haiti photographs

Haiti Mobile Health Care Clinic

An open stairway climbs the outside back wall of a church in the village of Lorie, in rural northern Haiti. It leads to a low abutting roof, a gap in mason covered wood slats, and a view into the church.

The photograph below looks in from behind the pulpit, and across the nave and pews. The furthest point is the front door. The day before people filled the sanctuary to pray. This day the area has been transformed into a medical clinic.

Over the past 8 years, the Haitian Caribbean American Organization of Texas (HACAOT) has brought a team of doctors and medical professionals to Haiti every November, to run a mobile health clinic and treat the medically disenfranchised. They stay in a house in the northern city of Cap Haitian.  Each morning they leave at dawn, travel to an area in need, and set up a full functioning healthcare clinic. They work non-stop until dusk, pack up, go home, and do it over again the next morning.  Typically, 250-300 patients are seen each day.

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Mercy Corps – Healing the Land, Healing the People

You are my brother and I am your brother, fellow man.
Whatever desire comes from your mouth, I will grant,
just as you will grant the desire that comes from my mouth.
– Inscription on clay tablet letter sent by King of Eble to King of Hamazi, late 3rd millennium BC

The town of Petit Bois is located in the upper reaches of a deforested valley, two and half miles long and a mile and a half wide. In the broader landscape, it’s but a wrinkle, part of a tangled mix of ridges and ravines – a small piece of the west-northwest trending mountains reaching from Port Au Prince to St. Marc.

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Posted in Environment, Food, Haiti, Relief and Aid Also tagged , , , , , , , , |

Boy Cools Off – Petit Bois

Portraits of Haiti – Petit Bois, boy cools off after working in fields.

Copyright 2011 Adam Bacher, All rights reserved. Absolutely NO usage without prior authorization.

Posted in Children and Youth, Haiti Also tagged , , , , |

J/P HRO Petionville – Earthquake Tent Camp Photographs

One of 23,000 Residents of the JP/HRO, Petionville Tent Camp.

January 12th, 2010 was a typical day in Port Au Prince, Haiti.  The streets were busy, the skies were partly cloudy, the air was humid and the temperature was in the mid 80’s (Fahrenheit).  Life for two and a half million people in the surrounding area moved along like any other day.  Then, without warning, at 4:53 pm, the ground, buildings, roads, structures, people and animals shook violently for 30-40 seconds.  When the quake ended, over 200,000 people were dead, 300,000 injured and 1.3 million were displaced.  The sun set at 5:30 that evening, and the city was dark by 6:00.  It happened in about as much time as it would take you to read this paragraph out loud.

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Hanging Tripe – Cow Intestines

In the back of the Point Sande Market, along the Artibonite River in Haiti, a woman hangs cow intestines on a line to dry in the sun.  Citrus juice from sour oranges is commonly used to clean many types of meat, including this – inside and out.  Once dry the intestines are cut up and used to flavor different foods, rice dishes, and vegetable stews.  Used like a spice, they add a refined meaty flavor.  For people who can’t afford meat, adding bit to other dishes gives a mild taste of beef.

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Posted in Food, Haiti Also tagged , , , , , , , |

Elder Abandonment

Her face pulled attention for a photograph.  Local vendors and their story drew wonderment.  The old woman often accompanied her daughter, a regular seller at the Pont Sondet market, along the Artibonite River in Haiti.  They arrived in mornings from the northern area of Haiti’s central plateau, worked the market all day, and left before dark.  Over time the daughter amassed debt, buying on credit and promising to pay later.  Her husband had financial troubles of his own.

One afternoon the daughter left the market without her mother, never to return.  Now the old woman lives at the market.  Other sellers give her handouts and make sure she’s taken care of, yet resent the burden of another mouth to feed. She’s wasn’t supposed to be their responsibility. The old woman is sick and can hardly stand.  She seemed ashamed of being abandoned and showed anger when speaking about it.

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Labadie School Girls

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright 2011 Adam Bacher.  All rights Reserved.  Absolutely NO usage without prior authorization.

Posted in Children and Youth, Edutation, Haiti Also tagged , , |

Battle of Vertières Day


Haiti’s ultimate independence from France was won in The Battle of Vertieres, a site now part of the city of Cap Haitian.  Historians tell that on November 18th, 1803, the leader of the Haitian rebels, General François Capois, mounted a great horse and led the charge against the French army.  In a hail of bullets Capois went down – his horse killed in the barrage.  Undeterred, he rose from the ground, drew his sword, and advanced shouting “Forward! Forward!”  Watching from the field, French commander, General Rochambeau, ordered his drummers to sound a temporary cease fire.  The fighting halted and a French soldier rode across the battle field to deliver a message to Capois:  “General Rochambeau sends compliments to the general who has just covered himself with such glory!”  The soldier then saluted the Haitians, returned to his position, and the fighting resumed. Continue reading »

Posted in Cape Haitian, Haiti, Historical Sites, Politics Also tagged , , |

Citadel Cistern from base looking up

The Citadel is a fortress built on a mountain top in northern Haiti after the revolution in 1804 to defend against any French attempt to retake the former colony.  Inside are cisterns built to retain enough drinking water to sustain Haitian troops for up to a year.  This photo was taken at the bottom of the main cistern.  Copyright 2011 Adam Bacher, All rights reserved. Absolutely NO usage without prior authorization.

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Midwife of Lorie Village

Bernadette Joseph is a  traditional Haitian midwife working in the Lorie Village area of northern Haiti.  The following is from an interview I did with her last week.

 

Q: What’s your name and what do you do?

A:  They call me Bernadette Joseph.  When the women are pregnant I deliver the babies.

Q: How long have you been a midwife?

A: For a very long time.  More than 10 years.

Q: Why did you become a midwife?

A: When I was a young girl there was an old lady who used to do this, and I used to watch her.  That’s how I learned how to deliver babies.

Q: How many babies have you delivered?

A: All those babies over there (pointing to the closest row of people in the clinic – photo above), I delivered all of them.  In a month, on average, I have about 4 or 5 babies that I deliver.  I have babies that I have delivered that now are pregnant.  Everybody calls me because they know how well experienced I am.

Q: What kind of training did you do to become a midwife?

A: I learned from the old woman in the village when I was young, and by myself, and with the help of god.  Nobody (formally) taught me anything.  There are others who are beginners, but I am the most qualified in this area.

Q: Where are the babies delivered?

A: I deliver the babies at the patient’s house.  Then I have to give them a bath; the baby and the patient.

Q: What do you like most about being a midwife?

A: I’m the type of person who likes to do good for everybody and that satisfies me.  They don’t pay me to do this.  I like to do this so much that the whole community calls me Grandmother.

Later in the day after speaking with Bernadette, I past by her house and took this photo with her husband and three of their five children.

Copyright 2011 Adam Bacher, All rights reserved. Absolutely NO usage without prior authorization.


Posted in Elders, HACAOT, Haiti, Health Care Also tagged , , , |